Galaxy_birdThere have been two neat articles on BBC News this week that I wanted to share with everyone (thanks to Chris). The first one is Dark matter comes out of the cold about the mysterious material that scientists know has to be out there, but up until this point have had no idea how to find or measure it. "Its presence, though, can be inferred from the way galaxies rotate: their stars move so fast they would fly apart if they were not being held together by the gravitational attraction of some unseen material." (For an interesting take on dark matter read the trilogy His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman)

The other article is Science team finds 'lost world' about a remote area in the Foja mountains of New Guinea that has never been explored by humans and contained 20 new species of frogs, 4 new butterfly species, 5 new species of palms and a "remarkable white-flowered rhododendron with a flower about 15cm across". There was also a new bird species (an orange-faced honeyeater), a new large mammal in Indonesia (the golden-mantled tree kangaroo) and Berlepsch's six-wired bird of paradise (photo above) that had been thought extinct.

It's simply amazing to me that there are still places on earth that are still so mysterious and untouched. Nature is awesome. The possibilities are endless, reality is often stranger than fiction and simplicity exists in perfect harmony with complexity.