This bit of advice might be one of the most important that I tell myself. Without curiosity and learning there is no growth or forward motion. Children are exceedingly curious, it is one their defining traits. They are always asking why and how because so much is unknown to them. At some point though, some of us cross a threshold and stop asking those questions. I hope that I never do. I sometimes say that going to school taught me how to learn, how to study things and build on my knowledge. My college education fueled the ten years that I worked in NYC. When I got pregnant I began the learning cycle again with every book and class I could get my hands on about pregnancy and parenting. Now, I am entering into a another new period of learning, taking online courses and attending conferences to learn about social media and developing a creative career in this new era. Today I am starting the 5 week ecourse Get Your Paint On and I'll be attending the Mom 2.0 Summit at the beginning of May. I love this kind of learning, it's at your own pace and flexible enough that I can do it as a parent. My go-to place for learning has always been books, but taking courses online or in person at conferences has accelerated things dramatically and really improved the network of people around me who are doing the same thing. In addition to art, design and social media, I also love to learn about history, science, literature and pop culture.

As I mentioned before, for me this series is an act of learning in itself. As I draw these letter forms I learn about the subtle differences in each letter and font, I look up the history and learn about the people involved. I could easily use the computer to typeset these graphics in a few minutes, but I love the process of drawing them by hand; pencil sketching each letter, outlining with a Micron pen, filling them in with a black marker. It's very satisfying to make something with your own hands and it's an important first step for me to make if I am going to be doing more hand lettering. I also discovered a new hand letterer this week, Sean McCabe, and I love his work. He's also got a section called learn, in which I was happy to discover his hand lettering process is similar to mine and he's also rocking the Micron pens, which I love and first learned about from Danny Gregory.

How do you stay curious and keep learning? What do you like to learn about?

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This week I hand drew the text based on Helvetica. In the interest of learning more, over the weekend I watched a documentary called Helvetica and I wanted to base this week's illustration on this workhorse of modern design. The documentary was filled with renowned graphic designers, critics and type designers (Massimo VignelliRick Poyner, Michael Bierut, Matthew Carter, Wim CrouwelTobias Frere-Jones, Jonathon Hoefler, Hermann Zapf, Erik Spiekermann, Neville Brody, Paula Scher, Stefan Sagmeister, David Carson) giving their opinion about this ubiquitous font. There are two sides to the argument, one is that type should be neutral and not get in the way of the content, the other is that type can and should have a voice and contribute to the message. Words used to describe Helvetica in the movie were all over the map: neutral, modern, idealistic, precise, boring, perfect, urban, everywhere, corporate, socialist, hated, loved, beautiful, easy, thick around the middle. It seems everyone has an opinion about it, depending on their experience, taste and goals for their design. Whatever the opinions of designers though, the truth is that it has been the most used font for the last 50 years on everything from corporate logos to subway signage to garbage trucks. It is an integral part of life in the city and our experience of modern design.

The photograph was taken of the Unisphere at Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in Queens, New York. The park was the site of both the 1939 New York World's Fair and the 1964 New York World's Fair and the Unisphere was built as the main symbol of the 1964 Fair. It was also built on the original site of the 1939 Perisphere. I was lucky enough to attend the 1986 Expo in Vancouver, Canada when I was 11 years old. It was the greatest vacation my family ever took. Talk about learning. Now I have an itch to go to another one, based on the list, I'll have to wait at least 3 years. Don't think I'll be going to the one in South Korea this year, but maybe to Expo 2015 in Milan? I love the Milan EXPO logo, I am so into CMYK colors right now. I'd like to point out that there hasn't been an Expo in North America since the one I went to in 1986. What's up guys? Edmonton, Alberta in Canada had a pretty strong big going for 2017, but it didn't receive the federal funding that it needed. Can we bring it to North America soon? I'd love to take the kids. Camera Equipment: Canon PowerShot SD600 way back in 2008!